Art World of Matthew Felix Sun

Fine artist. Art ought to be from life, and above life. To merely document surfaces is not enough: I want to grasp what is behind, which to me is far more compelling and worthwhile. My goal is to discover the truth in life, and to portray those hidden aspects boldly, without losing beauty that is seen. www.matthewfelixsun.com Paintings and Prints via ArtSlant.com Zazzle Store
Fruits dropping into water

Fruits dropping into water

DSCN0322 _ Stephansdom, Wien, 4 October on Flickr.

My Favorite Sculptures at Stephansdom (St. Stephen’s Cathedral), Vienna The most interesting work inside this massive structure was a sculptural portrait of Anton Pilgram (also Anton Pilchramb), a late medieval Austrian architect and sculptor. This sculpture, possibly a self-portrait, depicting the sculptor leaning out of a window-like frame, and above his slender body, a massive ornate altar, supported by elongated fan vault. The figure was very austere, yet the whole structure was grand and dramatic. The intense contrast was very intriguing and eloquent.

Magnificent Churches in Vienna Austrian Capital city Vienna (Wien) is not only the center of museum and music life, it also has many wonderful churches and cathedrals, large and small, most of them are of baroque styles, and some are fantastic Gothic, like Votivkirche and Stephansdom. In October 2012, I returned to Vienna and during my week-long stay, I visited many of these wonders - they were not only architecture gems, they were also historical archives of a storied dynasty - Habsburg, whose family members’ sarcophagi were in Kapuzinerkirche und Kaisergruft, including the ill-fated Kaiserin Sissi and the last reining empress Zita, and in Augustinerkirche, hearts of many. Furthermore, these temples of worship were also homes to many magnificent frescoes, sculptures, and moving musical performances, befitting to the cosmopolitan status of Vienna.

DSCN0370 _ Christ in Gethsemane after restoration, Stephansdom, Wien, 4 October on Flickr.

My Favorite Sculptures at Stephansdom (St. Stephen’s Cathedral), Vienna

My second favorite was outside the building, at the base of its massive walls - a relief of Christ in Gethsemane, a garden at the foot of the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem, where Jesus prayed and his disciples slept the night before Jesus’ crucifixion.

The stone relief thrust Jesus in the center of the tableau, kneeling above tumbling boulders, creating a world consisted of bare-boned elements. Jesus and his disciples were modeled in a medieval naïve style, endearing; the background scenes of approaching soldiers, the final climbing to Mount of Olives and the city itself, were depicted in an almost decorative way, unobtrusive, almost negligible. When I visited the Dom, Jesus was cast in the shadow, except for his upturned face - subtly dramatic.

Jelly Fish

Jelly Fish

DSCN1752 _ Archduchess Maria Christina Tome by Antonio Canova, Augustinerkirche on Flickr.

My Favorite Artworks at Augustinerkirche, Vienna

The Augustinerkirche (Augustinian Church) was built in the 14th century as the parish church of the imperial court of with the Gothic interior added in the 18th century.

The most impressive artwork was a tome sculpture designed by the renown Italian sculptor Antonio Canova, for Archduchess Maria Christina of Austria - in his typical neoclassical style - pyramidal shaped, with clear and clean delineation, and delicately modeled figures. The atmosphere it created was somber, sorrowful and soaringly lyrical.

Magnificent Churches in Vienna Austrian Capital city Vienna (Wien) is not only the center of museum and music life, it also has many wonderful churches and cathedrals, large and small, most of them are of baroque styles, and some are fantastic Gothic, like Votivkirche and Stephansdom. In October 2012, I returned to Vienna and during my week-long stay, I visited many of these wonders - they were not only architecture gems, they were also historical archives of a storied dynasty - Habsburg, whose family members’ sarcophagi were in Kapuzinerkirche und Kaisergruft, including the ill-fated Kaiserin Sissi and the last reining empress Zita, and in Augustinerkirche, hearts of many. Furthermore, these temples of worship were also homes to many magnificent frescoes, sculptures, and moving musical performances, befitting to the cosmopolitan status of Vienna.

DSCN1758 _ Augustinerkirche on Flickr.
My Favorite Artworks at Augustinerkirche, Vienna 
My second favorite work there was a strangely painted skeleton, surrounded by beautiful decorative borders. This frank depiction of death and decay gave viewers no catholic comfort, yet it was not devoid of any tranquility, a kind of knowing acceptance, which was the grace we all hope to have when it’s our time to take our leave.

DSCN1758 _ Augustinerkirche on Flickr.

My Favorite Artworks at Augustinerkirche, Vienna

My second favorite work there was a strangely painted skeleton, surrounded by beautiful decorative borders. This frank depiction of death and decay gave viewers no catholic comfort, yet it was not devoid of any tranquility, a kind of knowing acceptance, which was the grace we all hope to have when it’s our time to take our leave.

DSCN9231 _ Votivkirche, Wien, 2 October- 500 on Flickr.

My Favorite Artworks in Votivkirche, Vienna (http://matthewfelixsun.blogspot.com/2014/07/my-favorite-artworks-in-votivkirche.html)
This Neo-Gothic church of twin spires, dating back to late 19th century, boasted a famous Antwerp Passion Altar (Wood Curve) (dating back to around 1460). This altar was the best example of the achievement of medieval wood curving religion art in the low countries.

This Altar has grandeur, dignity and its moving pathos lies in the folksy naïveté and the lightened wrenching dramatic tableau it represents. I found it hugely effective and moving.

The Innocents - Dedicated to the victims of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 on Flickr.
The Innocents - Dedicated to the victims of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 The magnitude of the unspeakable tragedy of the downing of the civilian Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 by a mission in the war-torn region of eastern Ukraine was hard to fathom and absolutely cannot be accepted in a civil global society. Everyone with righteous mind mourns the loss of near 300 people, on their way to return to their homes, to see their friends and families, to go to work, or to make holidays. I was deeply touched by the tragedy and channeled my feeling into a gouache painting, commemorate this utterly senseless tragedy.

The Innocents - Dedicated to the victims of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 on Flickr.

The Innocents - Dedicated to the victims of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 The magnitude of the unspeakable tragedy of the downing of the civilian Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 by a mission in the war-torn region of eastern Ukraine was hard to fathom and absolutely cannot be accepted in a civil global society. Everyone with righteous mind mourns the loss of near 300 people, on their way to return to their homes, to see their friends and families, to go to work, or to make holidays.

I was deeply touched by the tragedy and channeled my feeling into a gouache painting, commemorate this utterly senseless tragedy.

Quilt

Quilt

DSCN0070 _ BAM-PAF Building Topping Celebration, 17 July 2014 on Flickr.

BAM/PFA New Building Topping Out Celebration Yesterday, I attended a block party on Addison Street below Oxford, celebrating the topping out of the new Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive building of University of California, Berkeley, in the ceremony traditionally held when the last beam is put in place.

According to the press release, the new BAM/PFA is “designed by renowned architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro, integrates a repurposed building, the former UC Berkeley printing plant, at the corner of Oxford and Center Streets, with a dramatic new structure. Opening in early 2016, the new building will anchor Berkeley’s downtown Arts District, engaging diverse audiences in groundbreaking art, film, performance, and education programs.”

The best part of the celebration was signing the beam - all the people present were invited to sign the beam with permanent markers - a courtesy doesn’t often extend to common folks, and yesterday the people were truly inspired and left many interesting “signatures” on the steel beam.