Art World of Matthew Felix Sun

Fine artist. Art ought to be from life, and above life. To merely document surfaces is not enough: I want to grasp what is behind, which to me is far more compelling and worthwhile. My goal is to discover the truth in life, and to portray those hidden aspects boldly, without losing beauty that is seen. www.matthewfelixsun.com Paintings and Prints via ArtSlant.com Zazzle Store
IMG_9004 - Study for Mirabeau Confronts the Marquis de Dreux-Brézé, Eugène Delacroix, Musée Delacroix, Paris, 2008 on Flickr.
My Favorite Artworks at Musée National Eugène Delacroix, Paris
My second favorite work there was another study for another historical moment - Study for Mirabeau Confronts the Marquis de Dreux-Brézé, during the French Revolution, over the procedure therefore substance of the congress of three estates. This study was both energetic and economic. The eloquence of the painting lay in the restrained bod languages of the grandees, whose multiplying dark frocks and gray wigs foreshadowed the mob scenes soon to come, and the gilded panels and roof of the interior clashed violently with the somber and unsmiling figures of the confronting parties. Despite being a sketch, it was a masterpiece, similar to many very revealing and satisfying study sketches by Pieter Paul Rubens.  The final composition of this work is in the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen. One day I’d love to see it there, and to see whether it would be one of my two favorites there or not.

IMG_9004 - Study for Mirabeau Confronts the Marquis de Dreux-Brézé, Eugène Delacroix, Musée Delacroix, Paris, 2008 on Flickr.

My Favorite Artworks at Musée National Eugène Delacroix, Paris

My second favorite work there was another study for another historical moment - Study for Mirabeau Confronts the Marquis de Dreux-Brézé, during the French Revolution, over the procedure therefore substance of the congress of three estates.

This study was both energetic and economic. The eloquence of the painting lay in the restrained bod languages of the grandees, whose multiplying dark frocks and gray wigs foreshadowed the mob scenes soon to come, and the gilded panels and roof of the interior clashed violently with the somber and unsmiling figures of the confronting parties. Despite being a sketch, it was a masterpiece, similar to many very revealing and satisfying study sketches by Pieter Paul Rubens.

The final composition of this work is in the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen. One day I’d love to see it there, and to see whether it would be one of my two favorites there or not.

IMG_9000 - Study for La Mort de Sardanapale, Eugène Delacroix, Musée Delacroix, Paris, 2008 on Flickr.
My Favorite Artworks at Musée National Eugène Delacroix, Paris
Musée National Eugène Delacroix (Musée Delacroix) in Paris is a modest museum which though contains works from nearly every phase of Delacroix’s career, covering many of his themes, along with some of his memorabilia. According to the museum, “Magdalene in the Desert, exhibited at the 1845 Salon and one of the museum’s major paintings, is a most unusual religious composition, as compared to Education of the Virgin, painted in Nohant in 1842. The museum also boasts the artist’s only three attempts at fresco, which were done in Valmont (1834).” These paintings, sketches and other works were intimate and quite personal, comparing to his more monumental works often encountered in more exalted institutions, such as Musée du Louvre. Incidentally, one of my two favorite artworks in Musée Delacroix was a preparation work for his gigantic La Mort de Sardanapale (Death of Sardanapalus), collected by Louvre.  Though concentrating on a small slice of the huge final composition, this study conveyed the same strange mix of terror and abandon. With its exceptionally delicate coloration, its figures looking like exotic birds in strange poses, this study was eerily beautiful and even evoked the calm world of Albrecht Dürer’s meticulous watercolor still life. Being a romanticist, Delacroix’s work though was naturally more sweeping in execution; being a study, it also carried impressionistic traits.

IMG_9000 - Study for La Mort de Sardanapale, Eugène Delacroix, Musée Delacroix, Paris, 2008 on Flickr.

My Favorite Artworks at Musée National Eugène Delacroix, Paris

Musée National Eugène Delacroix (Musée Delacroix) in Paris is a modest museum which though contains works from nearly every phase of Delacroix’s career, covering many of his themes, along with some of his memorabilia.

According to the museum, “Magdalene in the Desert, exhibited at the 1845 Salon and one of the museum’s major paintings, is a most unusual religious composition, as compared to Education of the Virgin, painted in Nohant in 1842. The museum also boasts the artist’s only three attempts at fresco, which were done in Valmont (1834).”

These paintings, sketches and other works were intimate and quite personal, comparing to his more monumental works often encountered in more exalted institutions, such as Musée du Louvre. Incidentally, one of my two favorite artworks in Musée Delacroix was a preparation work for his gigantic La Mort de Sardanapale (Death of Sardanapalus), collected by Louvre.

Though concentrating on a small slice of the huge final composition, this study conveyed the same strange mix of terror and abandon. With its exceptionally delicate coloration, its figures looking like exotic birds in strange poses, this study was eerily beautiful and even evoked the calm world of Albrecht Dürer’s meticulous watercolor still life. Being a romanticist, Delacroix’s work though was naturally more sweeping in execution; being a study, it also carried impressionistic traits.

A building in Shenyang, China

A building in Shenyang, China

Cake, Babka, and Fruit Salad

saatchiart:

Each week at Saatchi Art, we visit the studio of one of our artists. We check out their studio, take a peek inside their sketchbooks and, best of all, learn more about what inspires them. Read on and discover exciting new details about this week’s featured artist, Kirsty Warman.

Snails fascinated by water drops

Shoulder Bag made of recycled bus seats from Argentina

Shoulder Bag made of recycled bus seats from Argentina

The Triumph of Saint George / 聖喬治的勝利 / Der Triumph des Heilige George on Flickr.
George W. Bush, the Artist and the Apocalypse
Former US president George W. Bush (2001-2009) is immersing himself in the art world and has created some rather surprisingly interesting portraits of world leaders, most of them he encountered during his presidency, arguably the worst one ever in the US history. During his horrible and incompetent presidency, George W. Bush (GWB) was often criticized as an imbecile ninny occupying a high office due to his fabulous family connection - his father Georg Bush was the president of the US from 1989 to 1993.  To me, that argument was incorrect and way too benevolent.  GWB did many horrible things not due to his stupidity, but his fundamental believe in those horrible things. To me, this painting of mine, The Triumph of Saint George, created during the time he was drumming up the invasion of Iraq in 2003, reflects what he was; the painting also jump-started my ongoing Apocalypse Series., to commemorate the miseries of humankind. GWB was surely not stupid, and to his credit that he started to learn to appreciate art in his retirement.  Too bad, nobody had convinced him before his political ascendency that his spending more time in his own studio and many museums, rather than in Oval Office, would have benefit the humanity more, much, much more. It was just as tragic and regrettable as the Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien’s refusal to admit the artistically frustrated young Adolf Hitler. C’est la vie. Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:  - The Modern Art Iraq (Online) Archive - Politics and Profits - Herakles, not Hamlet - "The Triumph of Saint George" (2003) - My “Apocalypse Series” on Synchronized Chaos Webzine - Tragedies of Our Time - Thoughts on Originality - My Featured Work - Portrait Painting “Grandma” 

© Matthew Felix Sunwww.matthewfelixsun.com

The Triumph of Saint George / 聖喬治的勝利 / Der Triumph des Heilige George on Flickr.

George W. Bush, the Artist and the Apocalypse

Former US president George W. Bush (2001-2009) is immersing himself in the art world and has created some rather surprisingly interesting portraits of world leaders, most of them he encountered during his presidency, arguably the worst one ever in the US history.

During his horrible and incompetent presidency, George W. Bush (GWB) was often criticized as an imbecile ninny occupying a high office due to his fabulous family connection - his father Georg Bush was the president of the US from 1989 to 1993.  To me, that argument was incorrect and way too benevolent.  GWB did many horrible things not due to his stupidity, but his fundamental believe in those horrible things.

To me, this painting of mine, The Triumph of Saint George, created during the time he was drumming up the invasion of Iraq in 2003, reflects what he was; the painting also jump-started my ongoing Apocalypse Series., to commemorate the miseries of humankind.

GWB was surely not stupid, and to his credit that he started to learn to appreciate art in his retirement.  Too bad, nobody had convinced him before his political ascendency that his spending more time in his own studio and many museums, rather than in Oval Office, would have benefit the humanity more, much, much more.

It was just as tragic and regrettable as the Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien’s refusal to admit the artistically frustrated young Adolf Hitler.

C’est la vie.


Other Related posts on Art · 文化 · Kunst:
- The Modern Art Iraq (Online) Archive
- Politics and Profits
- Herakles, not Hamlet
- "The Triumph of Saint George" (2003)
- My “Apocalypse Series” on Synchronized Chaos Webzine
- Tragedies of Our Time
- Thoughts on Originality
- My Featured Work - Portrait Painting “Grandma”

© Matthew Felix Sun
www.matthewfelixsun.com