Art World of Matthew Felix Sun

Fine artist. Art ought to be from life, and above life. To merely document surfaces is not enough: I want to grasp what is behind, which to me is far more compelling and worthwhile. My goal is to discover the truth in life, and to portray those hidden aspects boldly, without losing beauty that is seen. www.matthewfelixsun.com Paintings and Prints via ArtSlant.com Zazzle Store

DSCN9231 _ Votivkirche, Wien, 2 October- 500 on Flickr.

My Favorite Artworks in Votivkirche, Vienna (http://matthewfelixsun.blogspot.com/2014/07/my-favorite-artworks-in-votivkirche.html)
This Neo-Gothic church of twin spires, dating back to late 19th century, boasted a famous Antwerp Passion Altar (Wood Curve) (dating back to around 1460). This altar was the best example of the achievement of medieval wood curving religion art in the low countries.

This Altar has grandeur, dignity and its moving pathos lies in the folksy naïveté and the lightened wrenching dramatic tableau it represents. I found it hugely effective and moving.

The Innocents - Dedicated to the victims of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 on Flickr.
The Innocents - Dedicated to the victims of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 The magnitude of the unspeakable tragedy of the downing of the civilian Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 by a mission in the war-torn region of eastern Ukraine was hard to fathom and absolutely cannot be accepted in a civil global society. Everyone with righteous mind mourns the loss of near 300 people, on their way to return to their homes, to see their friends and families, to go to work, or to make holidays. I was deeply touched by the tragedy and channeled my feeling into a gouache painting, commemorate this utterly senseless tragedy.

The Innocents - Dedicated to the victims of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 on Flickr.

The Innocents - Dedicated to the victims of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 The magnitude of the unspeakable tragedy of the downing of the civilian Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 by a mission in the war-torn region of eastern Ukraine was hard to fathom and absolutely cannot be accepted in a civil global society. Everyone with righteous mind mourns the loss of near 300 people, on their way to return to their homes, to see their friends and families, to go to work, or to make holidays.

I was deeply touched by the tragedy and channeled my feeling into a gouache painting, commemorate this utterly senseless tragedy.

Quilt

Quilt

DSCN0070 _ BAM-PAF Building Topping Celebration, 17 July 2014 on Flickr.

BAM/PFA New Building Topping Out Celebration Yesterday, I attended a block party on Addison Street below Oxford, celebrating the topping out of the new Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive building of University of California, Berkeley, in the ceremony traditionally held when the last beam is put in place.

According to the press release, the new BAM/PFA is “designed by renowned architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro, integrates a repurposed building, the former UC Berkeley printing plant, at the corner of Oxford and Center Streets, with a dramatic new structure. Opening in early 2016, the new building will anchor Berkeley’s downtown Arts District, engaging diverse audiences in groundbreaking art, film, performance, and education programs.”

The best part of the celebration was signing the beam - all the people present were invited to sign the beam with permanent markers - a courtesy doesn’t often extend to common folks, and yesterday the people were truly inspired and left many interesting “signatures” on the steel beam.

Wind Farm viewed in the air, seen between Oakland, California and Austin, Texas

Signature on the final beam for the new building of Berkeley Art Museum / Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA)

Signature on the final beam for the new building of Berkeley Art Museum / Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA)

Just watched BAM/PFA New Building Topping Out Celebration -
Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive New Building Final Beam Installation - 17 July 2014

Impressionism from National Gallery of Art (DC) in San Francisco (part 3)

Last weekend, I visited Legion of Honor Museum, San Francisco, to see a special exhibition - Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art from Washington D.C. (March 29, 2014 – August 3, 2014).  

The exhibition included many paintings from the period of the emergence of the Impressionism, most of them were of modest dimensions, with subjects ranging from intimate portraits, still life to familiar outdoor landscapes.

The exhibition was organized and displayed by artists, a choice group including many big names and a few less familiar ones.  Here are the paintings I liked most (part 3).

I saw this possum in the early morning today (July 16, 2014), walking in circles around an intersection, in a quiet residential neighborhood.

DSCN0593 _ Beethoven Frieze copy, Secession, Wien, 5 October on Flickr.
My Favorite Artworks at Secession Building, Vienna The Secession Building in Vienna is so iconic, that though it doesn’t have permanent collections, except for Beethoven Frieze by Gustav Klimt, I feel that I am compelled to include it in the series of My Favorite Museum Collections. Secession Building is an exhibition hall built in 1897 by Joseph Maria Olbrich as an architectural manifesto for the Vienna Secession and the Beethoven Frieze is a painting by Gustav Klimt created in 1902 for the 14th Vienna Secessionist exhibition and is now on display in the building permanently. The frieze has the hallmark of the overt ornamentation the movement, and it also addressed the life’s motifs close to Klimt’s heart, as it covered the themes of human yearning for happiness and fulfillment of desires in the dark and tempestuous world as can be gleaned through a snapshot of the copy of part of the immense frieze below.

DSCN0593 _ Beethoven Frieze copy, Secession, Wien, 5 October on Flickr.

My Favorite Artworks at Secession Building, Vienna
The Secession Building in Vienna is so iconic, that though it doesn’t have permanent collections, except for Beethoven Frieze by Gustav Klimt, I feel that I am compelled to include it in the series of My Favorite Museum Collections.

Secession Building is an exhibition hall built in 1897 by Joseph Maria Olbrich as an architectural manifesto for the Vienna Secession and the Beethoven Frieze is a painting by Gustav Klimt created in 1902 for the 14th Vienna Secessionist exhibition and is now on display in the building permanently.

The frieze has the hallmark of the overt ornamentation the movement, and it also addressed the life’s motifs close to Klimt’s heart, as it covered the themes of human yearning for happiness and fulfillment of desires in the dark and tempestuous world as can be gleaned through a snapshot of the copy of part of the immense frieze below.

An airplane flew by mine between Oakland, California and Austin, Texas

Impressionism from National Gallery of Art (DC) in San Francisco (part 2)

Last weekend, I visited Legion of Honor Museum, San Francisco, to see a special exhibition - Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art from Washington D.C. (March 29, 2014 – August 3, 2014).  

The exhibition included many paintings from the period of the emergence of the Impressionism, most of them were of modest dimensions, with subjects ranging from intimate portraits, still life to familiar outdoor landscapes.

The exhibition was organized and displayed by artists, a choice group including many big names and a few less familiar ones.  Here are the paintings I liked most (part 2).